Samantha, just Samantha (samantilles) wrote,
Samantha, just Samantha
samantilles

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Interesting stuff from work

Here now is part one of many a journal entry into some of the more fascinating reading I get to do for my job... Included here is a portion of an interview with Tolkien on March 2, 1966 by Henry Resnick, published in Niekas #18, Spring 1967...
I've left out most of it because of the unusually boring questioning this gentleman asked the professor, and isn't the highest quality I've seen...

Q.) Some high school teachers have decided to teach the books. Do you feel that they should be taught in high school or anywhere else?
A.) No. I am rather against that; I think that a lot of damage is really done to literature in making it a ... method of education, but I'm not sure of that...
Response.) I think that some of your reasers would certainly agree with you; they vewi the books as a pleasant escape and don't want to "tear them apart". That seems to be the common phrase...

Q.) You siad in your introduction to the Ballantine edition that one of your intentions in writing the books was to "deeply move" your readers, also to produce excitement. I wonder what parts of the trilogy move you most?
A.)Well, I don't know because I take a very external view of it now. I don't remember writing a lot of it. One of the things I remember moving me most in quite different ways was the sound of the horns in the morning when the Nazgul sat in the gate of Rohan of Minas Tirith (My edit... something tells me he didn't get this one right... maybe it was the sound of the horns when the nazgul sat before the Rohirrim at the gate of Minas Tirith? Still the Rohirrim horns none the less *woot*) Another one I think is the most moving point in the story for me is when Gollum repents and tries to caress Frodo and he is interefered with by Sam. The tragedy is that the good people so often upset the not-so-good people when they try to repent and its a tragic moment.

Q.) You also name excitement as one of your goals. Do you remember one passage in the book, or any single moment, that you find most exciting?
A.) No I don't. I thought I made a steady driving climax, that things mount in excitement. And one of the problems in writing the book was to go one better.

Tolkien also was questioned on fandom and fanaticism, though the quality of the print is too difficult to transcribe, though I will note his general feelings on it... it is a game he thought, rather than an underground fad or a cult, a game he doesn't mind as long as it doesn't become obsessive. He is not obsessed with it....

Anyhoo, more from the archives later... I have an excellent article on Convention buttons I just loved reading, and I must write something on it tonight before I lose it from my mind forever...
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